Special educational needs and disabilities

Our SEN Offer, Inclusion Policy, Accessibility Plans are attached:

ARK Oval SEN Offer October 2017 2018.pdf

Accessibility Plan 2016 2019.pdf

Definitions of special educational needs and disability

This section is about:

  • Definitions of special educational needs and disability
  • What to do if you think your child has special educational needs or a disability
  • Where to go for help
  

Special educational Needs (SEN)

Children and young people with SEN all have learning difficulties or disabilities that make it harder for them to learn than most children and young people of the same age. These children and young people may need extra or different help from that given to others. If your child’s first language is not English, does that mean they have a learning difficulty?

The law says that children and young people do not have learning difficulties just because their first language is not English, although, of course, some of these children and young people may have learning difficulties as well.

Many children and young people will have SEN of some kind at some time during their education. Early years providers (for example, nurseries or childminders), mainstream schools, colleges and other organisations can help most children and young people succeed with some changes to their practice or additional support. But some children and young people will need extra help for some or all of their time in education and training.

  

Disabilities

Many children and young people who have SEN may also have a disability.

A disability is described in law (the Equality Act 2010) as ‘a physical or mental impairment which has a long-term (a year or more) and substantial adverse effect on their ability to carry out normal day-to-

day activities.’ This includes, for example, sensory impairments such as those that affect sight and hearing, and long-term health conditions such as asthma,diabetes or epilepsy.

The Equality Act requires that early years providers, schools,colleges, other educational settings and local authorities:

  • must not directly or indirectly discriminate against, harass or victimise disabled children and young people
  • must make reasonable adjustments, including the provision of auxiliary aid services (for example, tactile signage or induction loops), so that disabled children and young people are not disadvantaged compared with other children and young people.This duty is what is known as ‘anticipatory’–people also need to think in advance about what disabled children and young people might need. REF:GOV.UK

Any questions?
You are welcome to talk to the Inclusion Managers; either face-to-face or via telephone or email.

At Ark Oval Primary Academy the Inclusion Managers are, Angela Batchelor.Days in school: Monday to Wednesday (9.00am-3.30pm) Sarah Lakeman Days in school: Tuesday only (9.00am-4.00pm)

Contact: School phone number or ask for Angela Batchelor or Sarah Lakeman at the front desk.